Ari Sytner

There’s no Such Thing as a Phone Addiction. Is There?

Posted by in Addiction, Relationships & Marriage

The traffic light turns red and the row of cars slowly crawl to a stop. It turns green and then red once again, but strangely, not a single car moves. As each driver is looking down at his or her phone, squeezing in just a few extra seconds of email or social media time, the world around them remains paused. Nobody has noticed the passing clouds, the ticking clock, the children’s laughter, or the changing traffic light.

This unfortunate reality has become the new normal. 

Yet, many ask, “so what?” If a person is sitting in their car, waiting in an airport, or standing in line at the store while looking at their phone – why does it matter? If anything, they are increasing their productivity by multitasking in real time! The truth is that in most cases being drawn into one’s phone does not directly hurt anyone. However, it causes us to miss out on life, people, and opportunities which continue to unfold whether one notices it or not.

John Bowlby is the father of psychology’s well-known Attachment Theory. The underlying idea behind this approach is that people form primary attachments in their lives, and the paradigm for that one relationship will be applied to all future relationships. When a person forms unhealthy attachments, the rest of their relationships will have the same flaws and will remain troubled or compromised.

This model need not only apply to our relationships with people, but even with objects! For those people who suffer with the painful disease we know as addiction, they live with a constant inner turmoil, which is most easily settled by giving into the addiction. That one drink for the alcoholic becomes the primary relationship in life, and breaking free from it seems insurmountable, despite repeated attempts to quit. Why would an intelligent and accomplished individual take another drink if the last one led to a fight, divorce, or D.U.I.? The answer is because the object of the addiction has become the primary relationship in the life of the addict – and that is not something one can easily walk away from.

One might say, “I can quit anytime,” but their track record may say otherwise. Being unable to put down the drink (or the phone) demonstrates the extent of one’s reliance upon it – and magnifies the unhealthy relationship one has with the object.  

Today’s cell phone usage has introduced a new relationship paradigm. No longer do people put their health, safety, or loved ones first – instead, the phone has become our first and primary attachment. While we have more connections than ever before, the quality of our relationships are being reduced dramatically, as the phone has become our go-to relationship for comfort and self-soothing.

While many are apt to quote the addicts mantra of, “I can stop at any time,” it is something easier said than done. I am fascinated when in the middle of a counseling session a client looks down to respond to text message. As they continue talking about important issues in their lives, their voice slowly trails off and stops in mid-sentence. A moment later, once the text is sent, their voice bounces back and continues talking as if nothing strange just happened. They are unaware of how their relationship with the phone is impacting what is happening in physical space they occupy.

Undoubtedly, this same scene repeats itself on dates, at business meetings and during precious family time. Yet, ironically, they sit in my office with tears flowing, trying to understand why they struggle to maintain happy and healthy relationships.

Utilizing Gestalt Therapy, I can often help clients to develop a self-awareness that enables them to identify that was is happening during our sessions is likely happening outside as well and negatively impacting their relationships. Many people will initially deny that one has anything to do with the other, much like the line of cars that are oblivious to the green light before them. But only when putting the phone down, or even better, shutting it off, can one regain their full mental and psychic energy to be fully present and aware of the world and the people around them.

Not only is the relationship with our phones robbing us of enjoying the connections with the people in our lives, but it in many cases, it prevents us from maximizing our mental abilities. Recently, I was out running errands when I noticed that I had forgotten my phone at home. It was a moment of pure panic. Shortly after, I felt a sense of calm as I realized that I was actually OK and not missing out on life. I was enjoying the scenery, the quiet, and my thoughts when I soon noticed new ideas that popped into my mind. Ordinarily, I would have immediately taken out my phone and made a note or sent an email, text or Tweet. I don’t like sitting on ideas when I can run with them. But then something happened.

The longer I sat with my ideas, unable to do anything about them but think, the more the ideas started to grow. Before long, I noticed that my previously half-baked idea was developing into something far greater.

It was that moment that I realized the importance of embracing a primary relationship, first with myself above all others. If I could only spend more time building a better relationship with me – my thoughts, ideas and dreams, only then could I work to enhance the relationships with the people in my life.

While I absolutely love my phone, there are other priorities which are truly far more important.

Thus, rather than live a beholden existence, where we are primarily attached to our phones, we should not be afraid to set ourselves free from time to time. By disconnecting from this virtual relationship, we will be able to better focus and fully embrace the truly meaningful relationships in our lives.

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Head-On Collision: How to Actually Win a Good Fight

Posted by in Relationships & Marriage

Newton famously said that every action has an equal and opposite reaction. Yes, this applies to relationships, and the way people’s words and hostilities collide when fighting.

When a couple fights, think of it as two freight trains racing toward one another. The stronger and faster they go, the more disastrous the impact will be. Plus, in all likelihood, at least one, if not both trains, will be severely damaged and even totally destroyed.

Therefore, in order to win a fight, the goal is to avoid a collision altogether by reducing the speed, intensity, and even changing the complete direction of the conversation.

Wait a second! What if you feel that you are absolutely right and you deserve to win the fight? Why should you not hold your ground and stick to your principles?

I want you to always remember this point: if someone wins, that means that the other person loses. If they lose, two things will happen.

  1. The relationships as a whole will suffer because your partner is defeated
  2. You are now stuck with a loser (and nobody wants to be in a relationship with a loser!)

Therefore, we must keep in mind that the goal of an argument is not to win the fight! Rather, it is simply to avoid a collision by changing tracks and resuming the journey, while heading blissfully together in the same direction.

So, how does this work? How does one simply change tracks?

Please indulge me further in my train analogy: For those who have ridden the subway, you know the feeling of watching a train fly by you in the opposite direction. As you look out the window, all you see is a blur of faces and streaks of colors. There is absolutely no connection to the people in the next train.

However, from time to time, a train pulls up alongside yours, heading in the same direction and at the same speed. It is during those moments when you look outside and instead of feeling the rush of motion, it is as if everything stands still and you can clearly see all the faces of the strangers in the next train. You can smile, wave and feel a real connection, almost as if they are in the same train with you.

This paradigm is exactly how we fight.

Take a husband and wife for example - angry, frustrated and armed with a laundry list of reasons why they each think they are right. Ultimately, like two trains, they will either violently collide, or just fly past the other in a blur and squander the opportunity to truly connect.

What if there was a way for the two trains to pull up alongside each other and move in the same direction so that they can once again connect and see one another, rather than only see a blur?

This is a common exercise that I do with my clients. I invite them to look at the other person’s point of view, digest it, and really try to see it through their own eyes. This is not only an intellectual exercise but an emotional one as well.

Instead of asking, “why is my wife so stubborn?”, try this: “I wonder why this issue is so important to her?”

Instead of asking, “why does my husband always think he is right?”, try this: “I wonder what I could be doing better to show him that I value his opinion and feelings”.

Thus, even if you don’t agree, perhaps you can stop and appreciate who they are and why they feel the way they do. Slowing down to appreciate the person more than the agenda, is what we talk about when we say that relationships take hard work and compromise.

Whenever we stick to our guns and hold our ground, nobody wins.

What we ultimately want to do is each abandon our own rigid views, in place of a suitable compromise that shows we care more about the person than our perspective. After all, you must ask yourself, do you want to be right, or do you want to be happy?

To contact Ari for relationship support, coaching or intervention - click here

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It’s the Most Dysfunctional Time of the Year: Dealing with Family on the Holidays

Posted by in Parenting, Relationships & Marriage, Stress & Adversity

The holiday season evokes many joyous emotions and memories. Yet, research repeatedly demonstrates the increased levels of stress, anxiety and depression.

At the end of the day, when we gather among family, the experience for many is not one of joy, but dread. Sitting across the table from Grandma or Dad, and hearing a barrage of passive-aggressive questions just hurts.  

  • What ever happened to that last boyfriend, I liked him?
  • Are you still in that same job, I thought you have more potential than that?
  • Any plans for a New Year’s resolution to lose weight?
  • When are you going to give me some grandchildren?
  • Do you always let your kids speak to you that way?

The painful list goes on and on. How could it be that the very people who supposedly love us above all, are most critical? It always amazes me how well-adjusted, socially aware adults can be so clueless about the hurtful things they say to family around the holidays (or yearround in some cases).

If you are reading this and nodding your head, the good news is that you are not alone. This is a universal problem and you are in very good company. Unfortunately, however, we are not easily going to change how our families interact.

So what can we do to best handle these uncomfortable questions?

The first thing to keep in mind is boundaries. Some topics are either too personal or raw that they are just off limits, and its ok to clarify that to family right off the bat. 

But if we are to respond, there are essentially 4 choices.

  1. Avoidance
  2. Sit there and take it
  3. Engage in battle
  4. Disarm and connect

Avoidance is a miserable and lonely answer. If your family is truly toxic to you, where they are emotionally and verbally abusive, then avoid them. However, there is a difference between them being hurtful and being toxic. Most families are hurtful and dysfunctional, but not truly toxic, so give some thought as to how deeply they may affect you.

Option 2 is to sit there and take it, leaving you feeling pretty miserable about how your family treats you. That too, will just send you towards a bottomless pit of pain, and you don’t deserve to be mistreated like that.

The third option is to fight back. For some, this works well, as it creates conversations that are long overdue. However, it is often not without tears, yelling, screaming and using dangerously charged words like “you always” and “you never”. Furthermore, it comes with the risks of escalating a dysfunctional relationship to a non-functional one, where doors can be slammed permanently. That is something we always wish to avoid.

This is why I prefer the fourth option – disarm and connect.

Let’s look into the hearts and minds of our hurtful relatives. In most cases, they don’t ask these questions to be rude. Quite the opposite, in fact; they ask because they care about you. It stems from a place of them spending years nurturing your development and having lofty dreams and expectations of what your future would hold. Your very existence represents decades of investments that they have made in you. What they may fail to appreciate, is that you are now an adult, and their job is to be unconditionally supportive of wherever your life has taken you.

Knowing that their comments are coming from a good place of caring, concern and love, how can you translate them into a meaningful interaction?

Try using a simple question.

Instead of answering their query or getting into a debate, try holding up a mirror to them by asking if they could take you back and describe what it was like for them during that stage of life. This should not a cynical or snarky response, but a humble and genuine one.

Try empowering them to offer their buried wisdom and guidance from their own life-experiences. In other words, we want them to recall what it was like being in your stage of life. Perhaps by recalling their own challenges, instead of delivering barbs, they can give you the much-deserved support and unconditional love.

For example, suppose your mother says something like, “any plans to settle down and get married soon?” Your simple response can be, “it’s a tough world out there, but can you tell me some of the details about how you and dad met – maybe I can learn something”.

With a little extra humility, we can take the high road and be reminded that our seemingly obnoxious relatives are not actually trying to be hurtful, they just really care. Therefore, by redirecting the conversation, we can point them in the right direction of what family is supposed to offer – true caring and support.

So if dad asks how your startup business is going, but he uses air-quotes when saying the word startup – you can either get really annoyed, or just smile and ask for any tips from his own business experiences. You have nothing to lose by this approach and everything to gain. In the best case scenario, you will help take the relationship to a more mature and substantive level, increase the bonding, and who knows, maybe even learn something.

Family is forever. Enjoy and happy holidays!

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Here’s a Quick Way to Stop Those Embarrassing Texts

Posted by in Organizations & Leadership, Parenting, Relationships & Marriage

The pen was once mightier than the sword. Today, there is something even more dangerous – the send button.

I am not afraid of the words I write, for they are easy to edit, undo and delete. The part that scares me is that little send button. It represents a tiny, but dangerous window between myself and the rest of the universe.

Who hasn’t experienced the embarrassment of watching a text message being sent, just as your brain registers the autocorrected version of your text? Instead of telling someone, “ I love you”, you might have just accidentally said, “I loathe you”. Slight difference, right?

What about those times where you sent the right text, but to the wrong person? As one of my clients explained, “My neighbor Jody was really annoying me, texting me day and night. I was so frustrated that I texted my sister to tell her how much I can’t stand Jody. The only problem was that instead of texting my sister, I accidentally sent it to Jody”.

Who hasn’t been copied on a group email from their manager, but inadvertently “replied-all” when responding to their colleagues regarding their ongoing frustrations about the boss?

I shudder to think about how many relationships have been derailed, how many jobs have been lost and how many people have been devastated by such impulsive and silly mistakes. All of these could have been prevented if only a little more restraint was exercised before pressing send.

Abraham Lincoln was famous for composing scathing letters to his critics, where he would unleash his wrath against them. The only caveat was that he would seal the envelopes and place the letters in his desk, never to actually be delivered. He found this exercise to be cathartic, allowing him to say what he felt, but to take great care to not hurt the feelings of others. This form of restraint is a perfect example of how one should pause before pressing the send button.

I have implemented a practice of my own, which I call, “The Slow Send”.

Whenever I am sending a text, Tweet or email, I press my finger on the send button, but I do not let it go for a few seconds. Often enough, during that brief moment of reviewing my message, I will notice an error in what I have said, or to whom I am saying it. Without lifting my finger, I can then slide it over to the side, which resets the send button and prevents the message from being sent, allowing me to correct it before it gets away from me.

While we are so blessed to have so many forms of awesome communication, we must be careful in how we use them. The fast pace and impulsive nature of life around us is aimed at tripping us up and, therefore, requires extra pause. I am glad to hear a lot of awareness regarding the dangers of texting and driving. Perhaps the conversation should start by realizing how dangerous texting could be just while standing still.

Consider using a “Slow Send” and please share below to comment and let me know if it works for you! 

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The Secret to Finding Meaning in Life

Posted by in Organizations & Leadership, Parenting, Relationships & Marriage

Treadmill + Shower + Coffee + Newspaper = Happiness?

Who doesn’t love their morning routine? We all love habits, as they make life comfortable and cozy. Instead of having to confront the dreadful anxiety induced by facing the unknown, we can simply find a soothing rhythm and live within the confines of that comfort zone.

Yet, there is a downside to living a robotic existence. When we settle into a life of complacency, it can quickly become stale, and at best, we will strive for mediocrity. How do we overcome that inclination and utilize our time on earth to truly live an awesome life?

The answer is to remember the power of 1.

Many people assume that the power of 1 refers to what the individual, or perhaps God, can accomplish. However, for me, the 1 represents journeying from zero to something which has a value.

If you had string of 6 consecutive zeros, the number would still be worthless. However, if you simply added a 1 before them, you would suddenly have a million! If we could add a 1 before every action in life, it would be tantamount to infusing purpose and meaning into everything we do.

Suppose your existence were reduced to spending each day turning a wheel. Yomoneyu would probably find it to be a painfully torturous chore. However, what if you knew that the wheel was powering a generator that sustained a person on life support? Sure, the task would still be painful and boring, but having that knowledge ignites a new perspective which adds purpose and transforms empty zeros into millions.

It is specifically through a purpose-filled perspective that we unlock strength, joy and untapped potential that lies within each of us.

When we know what we are living for, it motivates us to do more with our time and to live a greater and more meaningful life. The greatest way to fuel our daily existence is to think about others. By looking for ways to uplift our spouse, children, neighbors, friends and coworkers, we are placing 1’s everywhere we go.

When we can find opportunities to uplift the lives of others, it shifts the focus from our many zeros and adds value to everything we do. Even when we do something as mundane as going to work, the gym or watching TV, having a reason and a purpose (such as for family, or to be more productive) makes those tasks purposeful.

Life has many forms of currency that people value, such as money, clothing, cars, food, movies, trinkets or video games. All of these “things” are placeholders. They are mere zeroes that occupy time and space and will ultimately craft the epitaph that is our legacy.

Thus, even if we were to amass an abundance of all these “things”, at the end of life, of what value are they really?

Therefore, instead of only amassing zeros, and filling our lives with routines that are cozy, let's think bigger.  Imagine what life could be like if we were to pause each day to think about the needs of others and work to break free from our own little comfort zones and routines. By searching for the 1’s, we can learn to put the needs of the world ahead of ours, and add purpose, meaning, joy and goals to everything we do. 

So, what's your "1"?  Please inspire others below by sharing yours in the comment section.

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When the Romance Dies Down: Is it a Sign of Trouble?

Posted by in Relationships & Marriage

Many people believe that marriage is the best way to take a glittering romantic relationship and send it down the road to a slow and painful death. That’s right, say goodbye to the heels, hair and makeup and hello to flip-flops, sweatpants and scrunchies. But here is a little secret, romance does not die as a relationship develops.

With the right perspective, romance can grow, and more specifically, it can grow up.

Every couple enjoys the early phases of their courtship, which are filled with flirtatious ways to spice things up. There are so many powerful tools and resources that can be used to add heat, passion and romance into the equation.

Why then doesn’t it last? Why don’t couples continue to bring that same magic into their relationship as the years go on?

The answer is simple – because it’s just not realistic. Whether we like it or not, bedhead and morning breath are parts of real life. When a relationship is underdeveloped, those small things really impact us, which is why we take extra measures to put our best foot forward (even if it means keeping a hair brush and pack of minty breath strips under the pillow).

However, the first lesson is to set realistic expectations and realize that those initial efforts are only designed to buy us enough time to truly fall in love with one another and be attracted to what’s beneath the surface. Remember, the goal of the relationship is not to become infatuated with the external allure, but to fall head over heels for the person on the inside. When a relationship matures to the point where a couple learns to admire, love, respect and appreciate their partner in spite of their human flaws, that is when things are taken to a new level.

Too often, couples look back in time and long for their early days. They miss the simple life, where work, kids, mortgage, bills and demands were not a constant burden, and “love” was always in the air. I would suggest to such a couple that perhaps its time to mature and own the new, grown-up version of your relationship.

Since a couple cannot live in the past, how about trying to evolve and adapt to the new realities?

Don’t get me wrong, every couple should have fun, and enjoy romance, gifts roseand treats. However, it should reflect the maturity of a relationship that has developed over time, not the cutesy distractions once used to bolster the fledgling couple amid the courtship process.

So often, after years of being together, a couple may try to capture the sparks of their early days with a magical date night. The wisdom of marriage professionals suggests that a couple indulge in champagne, chocolates and flowers in order to bring back the romance. To their dismay, however, a couple may try it, but find that it just doesn’t do for them what it once had done.

Is that a sign of their demise? Does it mean that their relationship is doomed and will never be romantic again?

Of course not! While those treats can be sensual, fun and enjoyable, they don’t necessarily work for many couples that have since outgrown them. After years of being together, the depth of the relationship truly runs so much deeper than the superficiality of chocolate and roses.

When a couple has built an intimate friendship, where they have seen and supported one another through their highs and lows, through Loveperiods of joy and grief, and success and failure, the foundation of their bond is usually far stronger than they realize!

At this stage, the name of the game is true intimacy. While physical intimacy and flirtatiousness can play a large role, and should definitely not be ignored, the emotional intercourse which takes place
is equally, if not more, critically important. There’s a reason that the Bible’s euphemism for sex is “knowing” your partner (such as “and Adam knew Eve).

Don’t feel down when the relationship seems to plateau. The underlying message, is, “Congratulations! You’ve graduated past the basics”. It is at this point that you are ready to know and understand one another with almost a prophetic predictability.

When a couple can read each other’s thoughts and feelings, and even finish each other’s sentences, it is a sign that you have achieved true intimacy. It is only with that knowledge and predictability that you can be sensitive to the stresses that push your partner over the edge, or conversely, know the intimate secrets that make your partner’s heart flutter.

With that knowledge and power, create a fun date that shows that you uniquely have grown to know who your partner is and what really makes them tick. Being armed with that knowledge is enough to light a fire in any relationship!

For a Free Guide on how to Overcome Digital Distraction Click here4 tips

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Are there too Many Choices for Communication?

Posted by in Parenting, Relationships & Marriage

It seems today we are bombarded with more options than ever before, and the truth is, we crave them. When I buy a car, I want to make sure I can get the most number of options available, so that I have the choice to not use any of them!

When it comes to dating, there are so many avenues that one can take, that it only adds to the confusion. In some cases, it even prevents people from taking that important step forward, as they are more obsessed with considering alternatives, than committing to the one person they love.

When I was a child, I recall a sign hanging in many kitchens which read:

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Having many choices feels great, but it often gets in our way. I have found the same phenomenon when it comes to digital communication. Whenever I schedule a meeting online with someone, we find ourselves in this awkward dance. Should we call, Skype, FaceTime, Blab, email, Periscope, Google Hangout Webex, Viber, G-Chat or Facebook?! It can be so overwhelming, especially in light of so many new options being added each week. In the end, while we like having choices, too many does not really help anyone.

I have found that most people are just technologically not on the same page. If you’re like me, you prefer to keep your Skype and FaceTime address books for only friends and relatives. Some people don’t mind giving out their cell numbers, and others prefer to only speak from their office phone. As some of us only use Mac and others Windows, some on iPhone and others on Android - this chaotic world of communication options only discourages direct and meaningful contact. As I conduct a great deal of online trainings and communications, I have been searching to find a way to go back to basics and communicate without going through that awkward dance of asking people what platforms they are on, or suggesting that they first download software, apps, plugins and updates.

Thankfully, I am back to basics! While I always prefer face-to-face communication, I have been pleasantly surprised by how simple it is to just use a free web-based service like www.freeconference.com. For starters, what I like is that nobody has to download software! You can just have a regular call or conference call, or even a video chat with multiple participants that can see each other. (Personally, I use lots of slides and demonstrations, so I enjoy the screen-sharing and recording).

My biggest pet peeve, however, on conference calls, is when multiple people speak at the same time, then apologize for interrupting and awkwardly remain quiet. Inevitably, after that uncomfortable silence, they all chime in again at the exact same time (and you know exactly who you are, because we’ve all done it)!

This type of simple platform gives me the ability to visually see who is on a call, allow for a real-time chat box, and even allow participants to “raise their hand” in order to speak.  Plus, I can mute that one person who has screaming kids, or the TV playing in the background.

The bottom line is that communication is easier today than during any prior generation in history, and it really should be more convenient for people to just connect. However, while we have more options than ever (and the technology is quite awesome) we should not take it for granted, nor let it inhibit our connections. The best solution is to choose a universal platform and stick with it.

Remember, communicating effectively is about connecting with other people. We should, therefore, try to take whatever steps possible to remove any barriers that slow us down, and instead, jump at the opportunity to enjoy a fluid and meaningful exchange of ideas.

For a Free Guide on how to Overcome Digital Distraction Click here4 tips

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Technology Overload: What is Real Anymore?

Posted by in Addiction, Parenting, Relationships & Marriage

twitter reality

It was a beautiful Labor Day weekend and I decided to take my children fishing. As I stood with them at the water’s edge, I tried to let go of all of my responsibilities, work and social media connections. I proudly watched my children as they were trolling for sunfish and feeding the geese. It was truly a beautiful moment in time.

Then it happened!!

I heard the chirp. That high pitched tweeting sound that pulled me right back into the world of social media. For a moment, I felt angry. It was that stupid app, which was now robbing me of the opportunity to enjoy life, family and nature. No longer could I appreciate the sites of the children, birds and the water. I suddenly found myself traveling down a technology black hole, as I was eager to check my phone. I tried to resist the urge to take out my phone and look to see who tweeting. However, before I knew it I heard the tweeting sound again and could not resist.

As feelings of guilt took hold of me, I reached into my pocket and looked at my phone. Surprisingly, the screen was blank. I checked again, only to realize that there were no tweets, messages or alerts. I was baffled.

We’ve all experienced phantom vibrations from our phones, where we can practically feel the phone vibrating and we often jump up to answer it, only to realize that it's actually plugged in to the wall in a different room!

But who has ever heard of phantom tweet sounds?

Was I losing my mind!? Was I so addicted to technology that my brain was imagining it? Then I heard it again and I looked up.

I saw a magnificent nest in a tree just a few feet away from me. It was filled with the most beautiful family of birds, all chirping and whistling away. It was at that moment, that I realized how terribly skewed my reality had become. Instead of hearing a chirp and thinking of the obvious, my mind was in a far-off place. I had become disconnected from the present moment and part of my mind was living in an alter digital reality.

In the medical profession, there is a diagnostic concept, framed by Dr. Theodore Woodward, known as “The Zebra”. In other words, if you hear hoof-beats, think horse, not zebra. Thus, when a patient presents with obvious symptoms, consider the obvious diagnosis, rather than the exotic. Yet, in today’s world of technology-overload, the distracting zebra has now replaced the ordinary horse. It is both funny and quite sad that, when I hear chirping today, I think Twitter and not birds.

Don’t get me wrong, I am all for technology! I even yearn to one day call myself by the esteemed title of Geek. However, this particular incident was a wake up call. It reminded me of just how aware I must be to separate between my digital world and my actual reality which is filled with countless amazing moments with my wife and children.

How often are couples, coworkers or parents guilty of being drawn into their devices at the expense of enjoying and interacting with one another? Psychological research has demonstrated that even when a phone is nearby, a portion of our minds are distracted by their presence. Consequently, our cognitive abilities become compromised. The research shows that the closer the phone is to us, the greater the cognitive impairment. The only solution is to give oneself the gift of powering down from time to time and recalibrating.

By disconnecting our devices, even just for dinnertime, or while on a date, it frees up more cognitive ability to allow us to enjoy each moment and really make our life experiences into more meaningful ones.

Hopefully, the next time you hear the sound of a birds chirping, think life, nature and real birds – not @Twitter.

For a Free Guide on how to Overcome Digital Distraction Click here4 tips

 

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